Last edited by Yogul
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of Cheshire in Domesday Book. found in the catalog.

Cheshire in Domesday Book.

John Brownbill

Cheshire in Domesday Book.

by John Brownbill

  • 268 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by [s.n.] in [s.l.] .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18161777M

  William Reader, Domesday book, for the county of Warwick Recherches sur le Domesday; ou, Liber censualis d'Angleterre, ainsi que sur le Liber de Winton et Le Boldon-Book () Ormerod, George () Miscellanea Palatina: consisting of genealogical essays illustrative of Cheshire Domesday roll, compiled from original authorities (). Domesday Book (or; Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in by order of King William the Conqueror. relations.

This document has been created by the History Data Service and is based on information supplied by the depositor SN - Electronic Edition of Domesday Book: Translation, Databases and Scholarly Commentary, Bibliography This is not a reading list for Domesday Book and is in no way intended to supplant Bates, A Bibliography of Domesday Book (), which can be supplemented by Hallam. Domesday Book is the earliest, and by far the most famous, English public record. It is the record of a survey which, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, William the Conqueror ordered to be taken at Christmas ; a survey so thorough that not 'one ox nor one cow nor one pig' was omitted.

The Owls of Gloucester (The Domesday Books, Vol. 10) by Edward Marston and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at The Domesday Book of AD lists (in the following order) King William the Conqueror's tenants-in-chief in Derbyscire (), following the Norman Conquest of England. King William (c. - ), the first Norman King of England (after the Battle of Hastings in AD) and he was Duke of Normandy from ; Bishop of Chester (St John) Abbey of Burton (St Mary & St Modwen).


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Cheshire in Domesday Book by John Brownbill Download PDF EPUB FB2

Cheshire (inc. places in North Wales) The following pages include Domesday place-names and landowners, and beneath some are links to websites containing the local history of that place.

If you have a local history site that you would like to be included on. rows  Cheshire. There were places in the county of Cheshire in Domesday Book. Cheshire and the Domesday Book Specific Info about the name Venables in the Domesday Book Norman Surname Protocol.

The Wirral, Cheshire in A.D. offered a very different profile than it is was an important Cheshire peninsula. Domesday Wirral holdings of Norman families recorded in coastal Wirral were the villages of Eastham, Wallasey, Meols, Little and Greater Caldy, Thursaston. Domesday Book by page Current page: Cheshire, page 15 The original folios of Domesday Book, a complete survey of England written in AD Domesday Book: Cheshire.

John Morris. Phillimore, - Business & Economics - pages. 1 Review. Cheshire. From inside the book. One of a series of volumes covering the Domesday Book, county by county [some in 2 vols], with the original Latin text en face with a modern English translation and useful indexes of place-names and land 5/5(1).

Cheshire, in the Domesday Book was recorded as a larger county than it is today. There is a small disagreement in published sources about where the northern boundary of Cheshire lay, and some parts of the border areas with Wales were disputed with the predecessors of Wales.

One source states that the northern border was the River Ribble, resulting in large parts of what was to become. Domesday landowners; How the Domesday Book was compiled; What information is in the Domesday Book. How many Domesday places exist now. External Links: Family History Society of Cheshire; Cheshire History through the Ages; Study of Domesday Astbury, Buglawton and Congleton.

Macclesfield was a settlement in Domesday Book, in the hundred of Hamestan and the county of Cheshire. It had a recorded population of 4 households inputting it in the smallest 20% of settlements recorded in Domesday. Warrington was a settlement in Domesday Book, in the hundred of Warrington and the county of Cheshire.

It had a recorded population of 8 households inputting it in the smallest 40% of settlements recorded in Domesday. Domesday Book encompasses two independent works (in, originally, two physical volumes): "Little Domesday" (covering Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex), and "Great Domesday" (covering much of the remainder of England – except for lands in the north that later became Westmorland, Cumberland, Northumberland, and the County Palatine of Durham – and parts of Wales bordering, and included.

IN THE DOMESDAY ROLL. 19 Agreement between the same respecting marsh land, be- tween Alriches Holme and Holpnl, in the marshes near the Gowy, Legicr Book of St.

Werburgh, Harl. MSS. p. 15 b, and Coiicher Book, p. The Whalley Book omits the date, but is otherwise more full, and has the closing form as in the last article. Domesday Book, the original record or summary of William I’s survey of contemporaries the whole operation was known as “the description of England,” but the popular name Domesday—i.e., “doomsday,” when men face the record from which there is no.

Latest: all entries pages updated; site search fixed. The Domesday Book was commissioned in December by William the Conqueror, who invaded England in The first draft was completed in August and contained records settlements in the English counties south of the rivers Ribble and Tees (the border with Scotland at the time).

Toponymy. Cheshire's name was originally derived from an early name for Chester, and was first recorded as Legeceasterscir in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, meaning the shire of the city of legions.

Although the name first appears init is thought that the county was created by Edward the Elder around In the Domesday Book, Chester was recorded as having the name Cestrescir.

The findings of the inquiry he set in train were written up in Domesday Book. It is in this work that we find the first reference to Congleton in historical sources. The settlement had been granted by William the Conqueror to the earl of Chester, as had almost all of the land of Cheshire.

Domesday Book is the most famous English public record, and it is probably the most remarkable statistical document in the history of Europe. It calls itself merely a descriptio and it acquired its name in the following century because its authority seemed comparable to that of the Book by which one day all will be judged (Revelation ).

acres Altrincham Altrincham and Bowdon Arthog Ashley Road Bleeding Wolf Bollin Valley Booths boundary Bowdon Bowdon Guardian Broomfield Lane Bucklow Bucklow Rural District building built Castle Hill Chauntrells Chester Clough cottage Cotterill Clough Crewe Davenport Green Davenport Green Hall Domesday Book Dunham Dunham Massey Earl early.

Places in the Domesday Book associated with the name Earl Hugh (of Chester) Aldredelie, Ruloe, Cheshire Allestree, Litchurch, Derbyshire Alretone, Rushton, Cheshire» Show more. Alsager, Middlewich, Cheshire Antrobus, Tunendune, Cheshire Ashby [-by-Partney].

Domesday Book is the oldest public record at The National Archives. Visitors to the website will be able to learn about the history of the book and search place-names. They can buy, for £, a copy of the original page featuring the place and a translation of the entry into modern English. Domesday Book is a statistical survey of England in [url] it is a census of the population and productive resources of the country, of their value and of who held them.

It was unmatched in Europe for many centuries, the product of a sophisticated and experienced English administration, fully exploited by the Conqueror's commanding energy. - Tradition links Knutsford with King Canute () and appears in the Domesday Book of as "Cunetesford".

In a charter was granted to William de Tabley by King Edward I allowing a court, market and fair to be established. Knutsford has been the home to many notable people, from Elizabeth Gaskell – her inspiration for “Cranford” – to Highwayman Higgins, and 43 pins.The Domesday Book, our earliest public record, is a unique survey of the value and ownership of lands and resources in late 11th century England.

The record was compiled ina mere twenty years after the Norman Conquest, at the order of William the Conqueror. [5]. The folios of Cheshire in Domesday Book.

Uploaded by the Open Domesday project, released under CC-BY-SA by Professor John Palmer and George Slater. For an API.